SHSMO On Demand

SHSMO has a selection of on demand programs that are freely available to worldwide audiences.

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Larry Gragg, author and Professor Emeritus of History at Missouri University of Science and Technology, presented a program on Nov. 2, 2022, at the State Historical Society of Missouri Center for Missouri Studies that examines the impacts of desegregation in Missouri higher education.

U.S. Senator Roy D. Blunt delivered the annual My Missouri Lecture on Sat. Oct. 29 at the State Historical Society of Missouri Center for Missouri Studies, 605 Elm St., Columbia. The senior senator from Missouri reflected on how his upbringing shaped his career in education and politics.

In 2022, the National Women and Media Collection is celebrating its 35th anniversary at the State Historical Society of Missouri. This invaluable collection includes records of media organizations and professional and personal papers of notable women who worked as reporters, editors, publishers, press spokespersons, and other positions in the print, broadcast, and online media industries.

Watch as Bill Eddleman explores how to write and share your family history.

National History Day in Missouri (NHDMO) is a unique opportunity for middle and high school students to explore the past in a creative, hands-on way by producing a documentary, exhibit, paper, performance, or website on a topic of their choosing. Watch as NHDMO Coordinator Danielle Griego, PhD, announces the 2022 state contest award winners.

Watch as Bill Eddleman discusses the structure and function of DNA; different types of DNA—Y-DNA, mitochondrial, and autosomal—and when they are useful for different questions. Eddleman also provides information about testing and companies and the basics on how to use the data once you have results.

Watch as David Balducchi, retired from the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, DC, discusses his April 2021 Missouri Historical Review article, Harry Truman’s Tour of Duty as Missouri Reemployment Director: His Transition from Local to National Politician.

Watch as Greg Olson, independent researcher, writer, and 2020 Center for Missouri Studies Fellow, discusses his article, “White Man’s Paper Trail: Extinguishing Indigenous Land Claims in Missouri.”

Watch as Bill Eddleman discusses using manuscript collections for family research including an overview of the types of documents you might find in manuscript collections and discusses how information contained in these archival treasures can help you find ancestors and research their lives.
To conclude the 2021 year, the Missouri Bicentennial Commission, State Historical Society of Missouri, and Choral Alliance of Missouri sponsored a special multimedia concert featuring the Columbia Chamber Choir performing music including the world-premiere composition by Hans Bridger Heruth. The concert was conducted by Edgington Andrews and Nathan Lange; Anthony Hernandez, pianist; Andrew Lewis, cello.
Watch as Bill Eddleman discusses services available to find newspapers, what records are likely to be found in papers, and how to access records that appeared in these publications.
Watch as legendary Mizzou basketball coach Norm Stewart reflects on how his Show-Me State roots shaped his career.
In honor of the Missouri Bicentennial, watch as Judge Stephen N. Limbaugh, Jr. presents The Life and Times of Judge John Dillard Cook. A pioneer judge in early 1800s southeast Missouri, Judge Cook was appointed to the Missouri Supreme Court on November 16, 1820.
Watch oral historian Sean Rost explore unexplained lights near Piedmont, Missouri.
Watch as Bill Eddleman discusses using probate records in genealogical research and learn the difference between testate and intestate estates; laws relating to inheritance; documents generated by the probate process and what they mean; and the role of courts and court records in probate.

August 10, 2021, marked the two hundredth anniversary of Missouri’s entry as the 24th state to enter the United States. A state with many different regional cultures, geographies, and industries, we celebrate the accomplishments and diversity of all these regions while seeking to create a better understanding of our one Missouri and the ties that bind us together.

Presented from the front steps of the Missouri State Capitol, this formal ceremony marks the two hundredth anniversary of Missouri statehood.

August 10, 2021, marked the two hundredth anniversary of Missouri’s entry as the 24th state to enter the United States. A state with many different regional cultures, geographies, and industries, we celebrate the accomplishments and diversity of all these regions while seeking to create a better understanding of our one Missouri and the ties that bind us together.

Presented from inside the Missouri State Capitol, immigrants to the United States took the Oath of Allegiance to complete a lengthy process for this final step to becoming a U.S. citizen.

Voices of Arrow Rock is a theatrical production bringing to life voices of early Arrow Rock citizens whose experiences help us understand what life was like during the early to mid-19th century on the Missouri frontier. These voices transcend time and geography and help give a platform for underrepresented voices of the past.

Watch as Missouri Humanities Council Native Heritage speaker Galen Gritts of St. Louis talks about land acknowledgment of Indigenous people in Missouri and their history long before statehood. Gritts, who is a tribal member of the Cherokee Nation, relates the story of the historic tribes in Missouri and their forced removal from their home by the U.S. government. Gritts also speaks about what it’s like to be a Native person in Missouri and the continued presence and importance of Indigenous people to the future of Missouri history, life, and culture.

A Spoonful of History: A Culinary Tour of Missouri and our Governor's Mansion is a cookbook released in commemoration of the Missouri Bicentennial and the 150th anniversary of the Missouri Governor’s Mansion. Watch as Rebecca Gordon, executive director for Friends of the Missouri Governor’s Mansion, explores beloved recipes from the book and the history that made them.

Becoming Missouri's official state American folk dance in 1992, the square dance is a partnered dance with lively music and cues directed by a caller. Thus spirited square dance exhibition was filmed live from the Missouri Theatre during Together for '21 Fest.

Shirley Winans and Fred Goucher from the Missouri State Federation of Square and Round Dance Club organized the demo with Merle Hall calling.

In commemoration of the Missouri Bicentennial, juried Best of Missouri Hands artists Aaron Horrell and Barb Bailey assisted thousands of Missourians across the state in painting a large composite aluminum panel mural featuring Missouri state symbols, including the state capitol building, state flag, and the St. Louis Gateway Arch among others. Hear about the process of making this project a reality and the status of the final painting.

 

Grupo Atlántico is an ensemble of folk dancers whose purpose is to share the rich tri-ethnic heritage (African, Indian and Spanish roots) of the Caribbean and coastal regions of Colombia, South America. Filmed live from the Missouri Theatre as part of Together for '21 Fest, experience Grupo Atlántico performing traditional dances from Colombia.

In collaboration with Special Olympics Missouri, the University of Missouri and Missouri 2021 hosted a softball demonstration game in honor of the Missouri Bicentennial. “The Friends” from Kansas City played the “Jets Unified” from St. Louis. Filmed live at Together for '21 Fest.

Missouri Humanities Council and KCUR introduced Hungry For MO at Together for '21 Fest in Columbia. Co-hosted by Jenny Vergara, foodie and freelance writer, and Natasha Bailey, a chef, cheesemaker, and home gardener, the show celebrates how local cuisine connects us as a community and shapes our region’s identity.