Guest appearance

A tale of two cupolas: The Common Pleas Courthouse and the St. Charles Hotel

Southeast Missourian—Local lore suggests the cupola on the Common Pleas Courthouse came from the old St. Charles Hotel. The origin of this story is apparently the book, "Cape Girardeau: Biography of a City," by Felix E. Snider and Earl A. Collins. In a discussion...

Co-op Cut Rate Drug Store

Southeast Missourian—Elaine "Tommie" Davis opened the Co-op Cut Rate Drug Store, at 40 N. Main St., in Cape Girardeau on Oct. 18, 1933. An article ran in a 1941 issue of "Drug Topics" stating that Davis's store was one of the first to operate a Women's Department in a drug store. This ground-breaking department, for the time, combined baby needs, "Beauty Bar" and personal needs into one area of the store. This allowed for a one-stop-shop for female shoppers in downtown Cape Girardeau. The store also catered to men by selling...

Fact or fiction? Fort D myths and legends

Southeast Missourian—Myths and legends can prevent telling the full story of a historic site. This is the case with Fort D, Cape Girardeau's sole remaining Civil War fort, and Missouri's only surviving urban fort.

John Wesley Powell, second lieutenant, 20th Illinois Volunteers, and later captain on Gen. Grant's staff, designed and...

Protecting the home front: 7th Separate Company of the Missouri Home Guard

Southeast Missourian—The United States entered First World War on April 6, 1917, when Congress declared war on Germany, followed by a similar declaration on Austria-Hungary on Dec. 7. American troops would not be sent en masse until 1918. With war being waged, the Missouri National Guard was...

Southeast Missouri men fought the Battle of the Sinkhole

Southeast Missourian—Oftentimes we hear that the Battle of New Orleans was the last battle of the War of 1812, fought on Jan. 8, 1815, after the signing of the Treaty of Ghent. However, Southeast Missouri men fought a later battle on May 24, 1815: the Battle of the Sinkhole.

During the conflict, the primary threat to Americans was not the British, but their allies the Sauk, Fox, Potawatomi, Miami, Ioway and some other American Indians. Beginning in 1812, raiders attacked isolated cabins and...

World War II casualty: Arthur Clayton Vandivort

Southeast Missourian—The men and women who served and lived during World War II are passing away each day. What they left behind are photographs, letters, diaries and oral histories of a nation's sacrifice. Factories were retrofitted for war production, and citizens endured food and gas rations, while enthusiastically supporting war bond drives. The Vandivort family of Cape Girardeau had two sons who enlisted, Arthur Clayton and William Soresby. One made the ultimate sacrifice in defending our nation.

“A Trial by Fire Process”: Digital Archiving at the State Historical Society of Missouri

bloggERS!—Interviewee Senior Archivist Elizabeth Engel serves at the Columbia Research Center on the University of Missouri campus. Elizabeth’s entry into the archival field was due partly to happenstance. After enrolling in the University of Iowa’s (UI) School of Information Science, Elizabeth expected to work in public libraries—especially because she had worked in similar settings during her high school and college years. However, she seized upon an opportunity to complete a work-study assignment at the...